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Adult Sunday School Lesson Summary for September 7, 2014

 “A Vision of the Future”

Lesson Text:Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22

Background Scripture:Jeremiah 30

Devotional Reading:Jeremiah 29:10-14

 

Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22 (KJV)

1 The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, saying,

2 Thus speaketh the Lord God of Israel, saying, Write thee all the words that I have spoken unto thee in a book.

3 For, lo, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will bring again the captivity of my people Israel and Judah, saith the Lord: and I will cause them to return to the land that I gave to their fathers, and they shall possess it.

………………………………………………………..

18 Thus saith the Lord; Behold, I will bring again the captivity of Jacob’s tents, and have mercy on his dwellingplaces; and the city shall be builded upon her own heap, and the palace shall remain after the manner thereof.

19 And out of them shall proceed thanksgiving and the voice of them that make merry: and I will multiply them, and they shall not be few; I will also glorify them, and they shall not be small.

20 Their children also shall be as aforetime, and their congregation shall be established before me, and I will punish all that oppress them.

21 And their nobles shall be of themselves, and their governor shall proceed from the midst of them; and I will cause him to draw near, and he shall approach unto me: for who is this that engaged his heart to approach unto me? saith the Lord.

22 And ye shall be my people, and I will be your God.

 

 

TODAY’S LESSON AIMS

 

Learning Fact: To teach that after seventy years in exile, God promised to restore His people to their land and offered hope to them in a vision of the future.

 

Biblical Principle: To show that God will not leave His people; even in the midst of judgment, there is the promise of restoration and assurance of a better day to come.

 

Daily Application: To daily rejoice and offer thanksgiving for God’s love, comfort and protection.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

Rebuilding a City

   After a city is destroyed, should it be rebuilt? Historically, a devastated city would be rebuilt if the original reasons for its existence still served. In Bible times, a city needed a location that was defensible; thus cities often were built on elevated locations. This allowed a tremendous tactical advantage because a foreign army was more easily repelled if it had to charge uphill when attacking the city. Cities also needed ready access to food and water; these resources needed to be very close at hand, given the limitations of ancient transportation methods and lack of refrigeration.

   Cities were also established in relation to trade routes. A city located at a crossroads of such routes (whether by land or by water) could become a center of commerce. All these reasons were important factors in determining whether a city was rebuilt after being destroyed by war or natural catastrophe.

   Another powerful factor for reestablishing a city was religion, a factor that may be difficult for us to understand today. Places deemed to be holy needed to be rebuilt simply because of that fact (see Ezra 1:1-3). The current lesson looks at a city that met these criteria as well as the others above: the city of Jerusalem—perhaps the most famous city in the history of the world with regard to religion. Jerusalem was destroyed in 586 B.C., and the text we will study will help us understand why there was such a strong impetus to rebuild it.

 

 

LESSON BACKGROUND

Time:587 B.C.

Place:Jerusalem

   The city of Jerusalem dates to the earliest strands of biblical history. The first mention of Jerusalem in the Bible is in Genesis 14:18 in association with Melchizedek, who is identified as the “king of Salem.” (This may be dated to around 2000 B.C.; compare Hebrews 7:1, 2.) Salem—the second half of the word Jerusalem—is an ancient word related to shalom, the Hebrew word for “peace.” It is very likely that the Salem of Melchizedek’s day eventually became the Jerusalem of Israel about 1,000 years later, when King David defeated the Jebusites inhabiting the city, taking it as his capital. After this conquest, Jerusalem also began to be known by the designations Zion and the city of David (2 Samuel 5:5-9; compare Joshua 15:63).

   King Solomon, David’s son and successor, built a temple in Jerusalem as a permanent “house of the Lord” to replace the portable tabernacle that had been in use for several hundred years (see 1 Kings 6:1). As a result, the temple became the new home for the Ark of the Covenant (8:1). The capital city thus became the temple city. The magnificent temple was dedicated around 960 B.C. It stood until it was destroyed by the Babylonian army of King Nebuchadnezzar in 586 B.C. (described in Jeremiah 52).

   Jeremiah’s 40-year career as a prophet witnessed both sides of that disaster as God used him to warn Judah and its kings of pending divine judgment. God’s patience with His people had ended. He spoke (through the prophet) of the problem as a wound that would not heal (Jeremiah 30:12). Even though Judah had had a brief period of religious revival under King Josiah, it did not persist after that man’s death (2 Kings 22-25). Jeremiah’s message moved from a call for national repentance, to a warning of national disaster by the hand of the Lord, to promise of restoration. The latter is the subject of the current lesson.

   The arrangement of material in the book of Jeremiah is not necessarily chronological, so we cannot be sure when the prophecies in Jeremiah 30 should be placed during the prophet’s career. They speak of a return from the exile in Babylon, but it is likely that these prophecies are part of a series given before the destruction of the temple in 586 B.C. Supporting this conclusion is the fact that the chapter ends on a note that sees the outpouring of God’s wrath as something yet to come (Jeremiah 30:23, 24).

   Jeremiah 30 describes the glory of the dawning of a new day for the people of Israel, not only for the exiles in Babylon but also for the Jewish people in the latter days before the Lord returns. As you study, you'll discover that Jeremiah had two horizons in view: the nearer horizon of the return of the exiles to Judah and the farther horizon of the regathering of Israel in the end times from the nations of the earth.

 

 

God’s Message Transmission: Jeremiah 30:1-2

1. What is meant by “the word that came to Jeremiah” (Jeremiah 30:1)?

   The expression the word ... came to Jeremiah from the Lord or something similar occurs in this book dozens of times (examples: Jeremiah 7:1; 11:1). Sometimes this word of the Lord consists of personal information for Jeremiah (example: 16:1). At other times the word of the Lord directs Jeremiah to do things that have prophetic significance (examples: 13:1-11; 18:1-4). Here, though, what follows is an oracle, a message that Jeremiah is intended to deliver to the people of Judah.

What Do You Think?

   How can we know if God is speaking to us today? How is our proof of this the same as or different from that in the Old Testament era?

 

Talking Points for Your Discussion

   2 Corinthians 2:12; Hebrews 1:1, 2; Revelation 22:18, 19, Other

2. What was Jeremiah instructed to do with the words he received from the Lord? (Jeremiah 30:2)

   In conjunction with receiving the oracle, Jeremiah is directed to write it in a book. A book in Jeremiah’s day is a scroll consisting of sheets of parchment sewn together to make a long writing surface that can be rolled up. In Jeremiah 36:4 we find the prophet dictating his message to an associate named Baruch, who writes it “upon a roll of a book.” These words are later read by Baruch to the people (36:10). It is possible that this is what is intended here, although Baruch is not mentioned.

   God instructed Jeremiah to write His words in a book (scroll) so the nation would have a permanent record of the promises God was giving to His people (see Jer. 36:1-4).

 

God’s Declaration to Regather Israel and Judah: Jeremiah 30:3

3. What two-part prophecy does Jeremiah receive concerning Israel and Judah? (Jeremiah 30:3)

   The Lord gives Jeremiah a glimpse of the future in a two-part prophecy. First, the people of Israel and Judah will suffer another period of captivity. This compares the forthcoming Babylonian exile with Israel’s original period of bondage in Egypt, which had come to an end over 800 years earlier. The situation to come will be a forced removal of the people from their homeland to work for their captors. Part of the reason for military conquest in the ancient world is to secure workers to serve the conquering empire (compare Daniel 1:3-5).

   Second, Jeremiah sees beyond the period of exile to a time of restoration. This will involve a return of the people to Jerusalem and the land around it, real estate that had been promised to their ancestors (see Genesis 13:14, 15; 17:8). A true restoration is in mind when Jeremiah promises that the returnees will possess this land, meaning that they will not be merely tenants.

 

God’s Pledge to Fulfill His Promise: Jeremiah 30:18-22

4. What is God’s promise concerning the restoration and rebuilding of Jerusalem? (Jeremiah 30:18)

   In the lengthy description in Jeremiah 30:4-17 (not in the current text), God promised to deliver His people from a period characterized by anguish and terror. The latter would be a time of panic, not peace, in which even those who were physically strong would grab their stomachs in pain like a pregnant woman giving birth. In that terrible circumstance, the all-powerful Lord pledged to free His people from their bonds of servitude to Babylon. This dramatic turn of events would enable them to serve Him under a restored Davidic ruler. The New Testament reveals this king to be the Lord Jesus, Israel’s Messiah.

   In light of these fantastic promises, God urged the exiles in Babylon not to be paralyzed with fear. After all, He was supremely powerful to deliver them from their captivity in faraway lands and establish them once again safely and securely in Judah. The Lord acknowledged that He would overturn such oppressors as Babylon to end the displacement of His chosen people. God also affirmed He would chastise them in an equitable manner for their centuries of unfaithfulness. Yet He would not utterly wipe them out.

   Jeremiah 30:12-17 recounts God’s promise to heal the wounds He inflicted on His people for their insubordination. When the Lord allowed foreigners to overrun Israel and Judah and exile many of their inhabitants, the result seemed like an incurable injury. Their situation appeared to be utterly hopeless, especially in the absence of anyone to uphold their cause and bind up their wounds.

   The Lord was genuinely aware of the plight of His people. He knew about the distress and shame they felt over the indignities they suffered. God reminded the exiles that the injustices they endured were the consequence of them having sinned greatly and incurring an enormous amount of guilt. Nonetheless, the Lord declared that their time of trouble would eventually come to an end. Those who forced God’s people into captivity would experience exile. Likewise, those who had plundered the Israelites would be pillaged. In contrast, the Lord pledged to heal the nation’s wounds and restore it to health. The people of Jerusalem would no longer be considered as outcasts whom others glibly abandoned.

   In verse 18, God promised He would completely reverse the circumstance of the exiles. They would return to Judah and be empowered to rebuild their “tents” or dwelling places. Even their bygone homes would become the object of the Lord’s “mercy.” The latter term renders a Hebrew verb that denotes the presence of God’s tender affection. Moreover, He would enable the returnees to rebuild Jerusalem and the cities of Judah on their former “heap” (ruins).Similarly, Jerusalem’s palace, as well as the nation’s fortified enclaves, would be reestablished where they once stood.

What Do You Think?

   What “captivities” today keep Christians from serving God to the extent they ought? What can we do to help eliminate these captivities?

 

Talking Points for Your Discussion

   Captivities that those ensnared are aware of

   Captivities that those ensnared are not aware of | 2 Corinthians 10:5

 

Enabling God’s People to Flourish (Jeremiah 30:19-20)

5. How did Jeremiah’s vision show that Israel would be exalted among the nations? (Jeremiah 30:19-20)

Jeremiah continues his picture of the future, rebuilt city by describing it as full of happy, thankful people who are prospering and growing in numbers. It’s not difficult to imagine the intense joy the former exiles would feel once they resettled their families in Judah. Whereas before there was grief and mourning over being in captivity in Babylon, Jeremiah 30:19 anticipated a future time in which the returnees expressed “thanksgiving” and rejoicing. Previously, foreign invaders had moved scores of God’s people from the promised land. Yet in a future day of restoration, the Lord would cause the population of Judah to increase.

In the preceding decades, the enemies of the exiles held them in utter contempt. But God promised that a time was coming when He would “glorify them,” which means that they will be respected by their neighbors in adjoining nations. Then their “children” (v. 20) would prosper as in earlier times (for example, when David and Solomon reigned). Moreover, the Lord would reestablish the former political and religious institutions of the covenant “congregation.”Judah would be so secure that God would visit with punishment any foe who tried to mistreat His people. This growth will be a sign of divine blessing, the approval of the all-powerful God of Israel.

 

What Do You Think?

In what ways are Christians in general opposed in the twenty-first century? How should we respond?

 

Talking Points for Your Discussion

- Regarding obvious, overt oppression or suppression (imprisonment, beheadings:

- Regarding oppression or suppression that is hard to prove (discrimination, etc.)

 

Regarding Leaders and Promise (Jeremiah 30:21-22)

6. Describe the leaders of the renewed nation.  How will the prophecy have its ultimate fulfillment in the Messiah? (Jeremiah 30:21)

Jeremiah finishes the picture of the renewed city by describing its leaders. These nobles will be native to the nation (shall be of themselves), not foreigners. In particular, their governor will be one of their own people, not an outsider imposed on them by a foreign ruler.

It is possible that this prophecy is fulfilled by a person such as Zerubbabel, whom Cyrus the Great will allow to return to Jerusalem from exile in about 538 BC. Zerubbabel and co-leader Jeshua (Joshua), the high priest, will return for the purpose of rebuilding the temple, the house of the Lord (Ezra 3:8). Zerubbabel will not be a king, but a governor (see Haggai 2:2) appointed by Cyrus. While Zerubbabel ends up fulfilling some of the characteristics given by Jeremiah, there seems to be more here.

Jeremiah continues his description of this coming ruler by giving spiritual qualifications. The coming ruler will be drawn close to the Lord and will be devoted to Him. He will not be just a symbol of the nationalistic hopes of the Jewish people, but a person with a deep, personal relationship with the God of Israel. In this respect the future ruler will be reminiscent of Israel’s greatest king, David, who was a man after God’s own heart (1 Samuel 13:14; Acts 13:22). Zerubbabel is in the line of David, but he is never seen as a spiritual leader to match David.

While this prophecy is not as specific as others in Jeremiah, it does seem to look forward to the Messiah, God’s chosen and eternal king. Its fulfillment will not come until the advent of Jesus, who descends from both David and Zerubbabel. Jesus’ rule will extend far beyond the rebuilt city of Jerusalem, for He will be the King of kings and Lord of lords (Revelation 19:16).

 

What Do You Think?

   What can we do to align our lives more closely with the fact that Jesus is King and Lord?

 

Talking Points for Your Discussion

   Regarding the use of spiritual gifts | Regarding financial priorities

   Regarding secular friendships | Regarding time spent in Bible study | Other

7. What great promise concludes Jeremiah’s vision of the future? (Jeremiah 30:22)

   This section closes with one of the great promises of the Bible: the possibility of a close relationship between the Lord God and His people. This reminds us of the first captivity, the time the people of Israel spent as slaves in Egypt. When Moses was sent to bring them out to the promised land, he explained the covenant to the children of Israel using the same terms we see here (Exodus 6:7). This is the promise of God’s presence among His people, pictured in the law as the Lord walking among them (Leviticus 26:12; quoted in 2 Corinthians 6:16).

   Jeremiah uses this promise in other places in his book (Jeremiah 7:23; 11:4; 31:33). It is picked up by the author of Hebrews to describe the new people of God, Christ’s church (Hebrews 8:10). Peter applies this to the universal church, consisting of Jew and Gentile who have been formed into a “holy nation,” God’s own people (1 Peter 2:9, 10).

   Often we think of our relationship with God as a private, individual thing. But the consistent picture from the Old and New Testaments gives us the sense of being in relationship with God as we are part of the people of God. Yes, God cares about each and every one of us individually, but His agenda includes forming His followers into a people, a congregation, a new “nation” that transcends national boundaries and ethnic allegiances. As with the promises to Israel of the restoration of their city and its temple, the bigger picture is that of a restored humanity through the work of God’s Son, Jesus Christ (Ephesians 2:15).

 

 

POINTS TO PONDER 

1.The Lord God gives words of assurance and hope in our trying and troubling times. (Jeremiah 30:1-2). But we must write these words on the tablets of our hearts.

2.God sometimes allows us to experience difficulty when we turn from Him. Yet, He encourages us to return, and offers restoration. (Jeremiah 30:3)

3.We serve a merciful and faithful God who forgives, comforts, protects, and brings thanksgiving and great joy. (Jeremiah 30:18-19)

4.It is important as Christians for us to acknowledge God in all that we do and remain steadfast in our devotion to Him. (Jeremiah 30:21-22)

 

 

CONCLUSION

 

Rebuilding Jerusalem

We wonder how the prophecy was received by Jeremiah’s audience! When they looked around, they did not see a Jerusalem in ruins. They saw no need for rebuilding. Only with a tremendous leap of faith could those folks understand that God’s wrath was to destroy their city, and thereby see the promise of future restoration as a message of hope. They had neither the hindsight of our perspective nor the foresight of Jeremiah. They could not conceive of the destruction of the mighty temple that had stood for over three centuries (see Jeremiah 7:4). For this reason, history records they did not heed Jeremiah’s call for repentance and for trust in the Lord (17:7).

Many Christians today view events of the twentieth century in the land of modern Israel as necessary fulfillment of various prophecies, and therefore crucial to the outworking of God’s plans. The establishment of the modern state of Israel in 1948 was followed by the immigration of hundreds of thousands of Jewish people from all over the world. The Western powers endorsed these moves, partly to atone for the genocide of European Jews by the Nazis.

The city of Jerusalem did not lay in ruins in 1948, but it was nothing like the city promised by Jeremiah and the other prophets. It had no palace for the king, and if it had such a structure, it would have remained empty. It had no temple, for a Muslim shrine stood in its place. It was hardly “Salem,” a city of peace, but a place of great tension and sectarian street violence. Some still look to a day when a new temple will be built in Jerusalem to fulfill their understanding of prophecy.

But these are not the concerns of Jeremiah’s vision of the future. He speaks of a restored city (Jeremiah 30:18), but he does not mention a restored temple in this chapter. He speaks of the restoration of a king in the line of David (30:9), but not of a new house (temple) of the Lord like Solomon’s grand structure. Jeremiah’s vision is more like that of Revelation 21, where the apostle John has a vision of the new Jerusalem descending from Heaven. There will be no temple in that perfect city, for the Lord himself will be its temple (Revelation 21:22). That city will be populated by peoples from all nations; it will be a city of great songs of thanksgiving and praise. Jeremiah’s promises are not just for the people of Judah facing and looking beyond the Babylonian oppression. They are also for us, the people of God, who look forward to joining our King Jesus in the city prepared for all eternity.

 

PRAYER

   Lord God, and Heavenly Father, You always have a plan for Your people. Your plan may include discipline so that we can be chastened, but restoration is always the final result. May we ever be ready to remain faithful, even in times of great stress and uncertainty. May You heal our wounds and bind us close to You. We pray these things in the name of Jesus our king; amen.

 

THOUGHT TO REMEMBER

   The pain of exile will give way to the joy of restoration.

 

ANTICIPATING THE NEXT LESSON

   Next week's lesson is “Hope for the Future,”and focuses on God’s new covenant with His people in which He writes the law on their hearts. Study Jeremiah 31.

 

WORKS CITED 

Life Application Bible—New Revised Standard Version. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers. 

Scofield, C.I., ed.  The New Scofield Study Bible—King James Version. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Summary and commentary derived from Standard Lesson Commentary Copyright 2014 by permission of Standard Publishing. 

The KJV Parallel Bible Commentary, by Nelson Books.

The Pulpit Commentary, Spence-Jones, H. D. M. (Hrsg.), Bellingham, WA : Logos Research Systems, Inc.

Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, Cook

 

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Mustard Seed Children’s Lesson Summary for September 7, 2014

“Returning to God”

Lesson Text: Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22

Background Scripture:Jeremiah 30

Memory Verse:“And ye shall be my people, and I will be your God” (Jeremiah 30:22).

 

Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22 (KJV)

1 The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, saying,

2 Thus speaketh the Lord God of Israel, saying, Write thee all the words that I have spoken unto thee in a book.

3 For, lo, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will bring again the captivity of my people Israel and Judah, saith the Lord: and I will cause them to return to the land that I gave to their fathers, and they shall possess it.

………………………………………………………..

18 Thus saith the Lord; Behold, I will bring again the captivity of Jacob’s tents, and have mercy on his dwellingplaces; and the city shall be builded upon her own heap, and the palace shall remain after the manner thereof.

19 And out of them shall proceed thanksgiving and the voice of them that make merry: and I will multiply them, and they shall not be few; I will also glorify them, and they shall not be small.

20 Their children also shall be as aforetime, and their congregation shall be established before me, and I will punish all that oppress them.

21 And their nobles shall be of themselves, and their governor shall proceed from the midst of them; and I will cause him to draw near, and he shall approach unto me: for who is this that engaged his heart to approach unto me? saith the Lord.

22 And ye shall be my people, and I will be your God.

 

KEY CONCEPT

God’s people sinned and turned away from Him, and were punished for their wrong doings.  But God still loved them and encouraged them to return to Him.

 

 

MESSAGE TO CHILDREN

1.God loves us and wants us to obey His Word.

2.Not everyone will obey God, and some will turn away from Him.

3.If those who have turned from God will return to Him, then He will forgive and restore them.

   For Today’s Story Lesson, you will need your Bible and pictures to represent the Prophet Jeremiah, the people of Israel/Judah, the leaders, a scroll, Jerusalem and Babylon.

For Helping Hands, you will need brown or tan paper or craft paper, two sticks for each student (you can use dowels, pencils, etc.), pens, markers, tape or glue and yarn.

 

WOrDs TO KNOW And Explain

Future– time that has not happened yet

Increase– to grow in numbers

Prophet– a person sent by God with a message; a messenger

Repent– to be sorry for sins and change one’s ways

Return- to go back to something, someone or some place

Scroll– a roll of paper used to write on in ancient times

 

TEACHER’S NOTES

Time:587 B.C.

Place:Jerusalem

The Prophet Jeremiah had a 40-year career as a prophet.  God used him to warn the people about pending divine judgment and to call for national repentance.  He warned the people of national disaster by the hand of the Lord, but he also had a message of the promise of restoration. The latter is the subject of the current lesson.

Jeremiah 30 describes the glory of the dawning of a new day for the people of Israel, not only for the exiles in Babylon but also for the Jewish people in the latter days before the Lord returns. As you study, you'll discover that Jeremiah had two horizons in view: the nearer horizon of the return of the exiles to Judah and the farther horizon of the regathering of Israel in the end times from the nations of the earth.

 

 

TODAY’S STORY LESSON

The Prophet Jeremiah was a messenger sent by God to tell His people about their future, and how they would be punished for their sins if they did not repent.  (Show Jeremiah.)  God told Jeremiah to write the words He told him in a book (or scroll).  (Show scroll.)

Jeremiah reminded the people of how they had promised to obey and serve God.  But now they had turned away from God.  Jeremiah warned them that God would not protect them from their enemies if they did not repent (be sorry for their sins and change their ways) and return to Him.

But the people did not listen.  Jeremiah told the people that God would destroy the city of Jerusalem.  (Show Jerusalem.)  Jerusalem was a very special city to the people and was where a temple had been built as a place of worship.  Jeremiah also told them that they would be forced to leave their country and taken as prisoners (captives) to a place called Babylon. (Show Babylon.)

The people did not believe Jeremiah’s message.   But when Jerusalem was destroyed and they were taken to Babylon, they believed that this punishment from the Lord would only be for a short time.  They thought they would return to their land very soon. 

But Jeremiah was sent by God to let them know that they would be kept as prisoners for a very long time (70 years).  This was not good news, and many of the people still did not believe Jeremiah’s message.

Although Jeremiah had to give the bad news to the people, he also had a message of hope for their future.  Things would not always be bad for the people.  God wanted to forgive them and wanted them to return to Him (to live for and obey Him). Jeremiah encouraged the people to return to the Lord.

After living in another land for so many years, God promised to bring the people and their children back to their land.  God would take care of them and bless them.  They would not be ruled by their enemies anymore, and they would have their own leaders.  (Show leaders.)  The number of people in the nation would increase (grow), and they would be very happy.  The Lord promised to be their God, and they would be His people.

 

TELLING HOW TO LIVE

God loves us, and we are His people.  But we are not perfect.  We do not always do the right things.  In those times, God does not want us to keep doing wrong.  He wants us to ask for forgiveness and to return to Him.  We can make the decision to turn to God.  If we do, He will bless us.

 

HELPING HANDS

Make a scroll as a reminder that God told Jeremiah to write all the words that He spoke to him.  Use this activity along with the review of the memory verse.

Write the scripture memory verse on the scroll. Roll the paper into a ball, smooth it out and repeat until the paper looks as if it is very old.  Attach the sticks to each end of the paper using the tap or glue. Roll each end until they meet in the center.  Use a piece of yarn to hold the scroll together.

EXPLAINING THE MEMORY VERSE

   “And ye shall be my people, and I will be your God” (Jeremiah 30:22).

This scripture verse was God’s promise to His people after they returned to Him.  After they returned to the Lord and He brought them back to their homeland, and promised to bless the people.  They would have a very special relationship with Him.  They would be His people.  He would be their God. 

 

CONCLUSION

As God’s people, we may not always do the right things or make the right decisions.  But God’s love and His forgiveness allows us to return to Him.  God will restore, comfort and give hope to all who return to Him!

 

PRAYER

   Dear Heavenly Father God, thank You for sending Jesus to die for our sins. Help us to turn from our sins and to return to You, in Jesus’ name.  Amen.

 

ANTICIPATING THE NEXT LESSON

    Next week's lesson is “A New Promise,” and tells how God made a new covenant (promise) with His people and would send Jesus (The Messiah) to take away their sins. Study Jeremiah 31.

 

 

 

WORD SEARCH PUZZLE

 

“Returning to God”(Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22)

   
   
         

NAME: _______________________DATE:  ________________

 

 

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O

T

U

D

M

M

U

 

J

L

F

T

T

S

N

K

E

H

J

G

P

D

Y

 

T

O

U

M

C

L

O

R

H

U

H

A

P

P

Y

 

A

K

V

Q

L

O

P

E

O

P

L

E

N

O

V

 

O

H

K

N

B

I

I

N

M

N

D

S

N

B

E

 

O

H

K

H

C

B

V

J

E

G

S

H

Z

T

H

 

Find the following keywords from Today’s Story Lesson:

 

BOOK
CITY
GROW
HAPPY
HOME
ISRAEL
JEREMIAH
LEADERS
PEOPLE
PRISONERS
PROMISE
PROPHET
PUNISH
RETURN
THANKS
WORDS